Carpe Diem Haiku: Tanpopo (Dandelion)

My wish was torn loose
Floating away from my grasp
Carried by the wind…

Photo located at: http://truevibes.wordpress.com/2012/11/06/make-a-wish/

Photo located at: http://truevibes.wordpress.com/2012/11/06/make-a-wish/

A delight in youth.
Devilish in midlife years.
What’s to come of us?

DSCN0819

Loosed by wind stirring
While firmly rooted in place.
Who’s to understand?

________________________________________________________________________________

Carpe Diem’s haiku challenges us this month to explore classical Japanese kigo (seasonwords).
March 29’s prompt celebrates the beginning of Spring with: Tanpopo (Dandelion).

I was first inspired by my memories of holding a ripened, white crested wish-filled dandy-lion as a child.

Then I was captured by the comparison of the memories that might be evoked between a dandelion’s life as compared to mankind’s.

And then I found myself contemplating on this weedy, curious little flower until I found myself traveling through its rooted system…while thinking on this specific day.

To be perfectly honest, I’m intrigued by the simple magic of the dandelion (which translates as “lion’s tooth”).

  • The floral meaning of the dandelion is meant to be a gift to a loved one that will provide happiness and a promise of total faithfulness.
  • I’m sure it’s the first gift I’ve ever been given by any child as an expression of affection. The pudgy little hands that plucked it, the unsteady little legs that wobbled to get it to me, the sparkling delight of the eyes as it was presented for my delightful gratitude — all give this perfect gift in such a simple, yet extraordinary, fashion.
  • I can recall its explosive power as a child – the power that drew me to run to grasp the stem of a ripened dandelion, so I could send my wishes a thousand directions out from me into a vast world of possibilities.
  • I recall my disappointment in learning that adults do not appreciate the lovely yellow gifting of these sweet, tiny bits of sunshine sprinkled into an otherwise boringly manicured lawn.
  • Yet, I’ve learned, their temporal daintiness is deceptive. They are persistent in their existence, spreading established deep roots and eternal seeding among us.
  • Despite our offenses against them, they continue to extend healing properties to us.

So I can’t imagine a more appropriate day to honor the dandelion than today, Good Friday, the day in which I must stop in faith and honor my Lord & Savior who continues to extend that same healing property to me, despite my offenses against Him. Everything about this day – representing His crucifixion, His body’s burial in a tomb – seem to represent the end of His good among us. Where child-like eyes and ears delighted in His gift, grown-up hearts saw Him as a nuisance in their world – a pest, a weed that needed to be removed. Where he came to sprinkle sunshine among them, they preferred their manicured earth they thought they could manage just fine on their own.

Despite our most horrible offenses, we will yet find His deeply established roots and eternal seeding among us. The (dandy) Lion of Judah is yet to rise come Easter morn to bring the ultimate gift of love to us, His joy with a promise of total faithfulness. Lord, let me see you anew with child-like eyes and a heart filled with childish delight. Let my faith be loosed by your spirit’s wind, wherever it chooses to blow.

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12 thoughts on “Carpe Diem Haiku: Tanpopo (Dandelion)

    • To me, that may be one of the greatest ironies to “growth” from childhood to adulthood. The child blows the wish out into the world, unconcerned with where it may travel or how it might get there, while the adult, who has a knowing of loss, tries to cling tightly to it, fearful of it being taken away, afraid of letting go. The magic thereby gets lost. What’s to come of us? Who’s to understand?

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